Tag Archives: Christian

Reason, Religion, and Politics

Nothing ignites one’s personal passion, fury, excitement, etc, like religion or politics. Everyone knows it. Smart people steer clear of these topics with people they don’t know well, lest they risk a fight; physical or verbal. Recently I had this well-known truth exemplified for me once again at a local political caucus. Normally the local caucus is fairly tame event. This year, due to a number of factors, our local county caucus was imbued with power and importance.

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Blogging for Pastors: Tips & Thoughts

The odds are, since I’m writing this in a blog,  that I am probably preaching to the choir.  I certainly don’t stake any claim  as a master Christian blogger or social media maven.  Yet, as I become more involved in writing blogs, reading blogs, commenting on blogs, and involving myself in the blog/social media community, I cannot help but think how important blogging is, or could be, for pastors.  Of course I realize that I am nowhere even close to being unique in having this sort of epiphany.  The power of blogs and other social media platforms is readily apparent.

Blogging, tweeting, and the power of social media should not just be employed by pastors of large churches.  Without citing any sort of statistics,  If your congregation, home church, life group, etc, is made up people ranging from 16-50 years of age, the odds are that your “tribe” is at least minimally acquainted with technology and social media.  I would even venture to guess that a large and growing portion of your congregation has smart phones of some sort.  Americans love their gadgets.  As a pastor, no matter what size your church, it is irresponsible to not take advantage of the tools available to reach your audience in every way possible; especially since many of the tools are free. Continue reading

Spiritual Disciplines and the Christian Community

I hate working out.  Sure, I understand all the various benefits of exercise, and I want to experience those benefits in my life: health, energy, big muscles, etc.  My problem, and I’m sure I’m not alone, is that I am not a fan of running, lifting weights, or other such activities that produce health benefits.  When I was younger exercise was never an issue.  I played soccer, tennis, participated in martial arts and other cardio-type activities and exercises all the time.  As I’ve gotten older, and my life has gotten more hectic, I discover that I have a whole backpack full of excuses readily available to help me avoid strenuous cardio-related activity.  Eventually, as I can begin to see my waist-line expand, as my physical self-image begins to deteriorate, and as my clothes begin to reach their comfortable capacity, I force myself to address my less than desirable physical status.  Just like my love-hate relationship with physical activity/exercise, each of us has  our own situational breaking point where the consequences of our personal neglect becomes unbearable, and change becomes mandatory. Continue reading

Artful Armor

Once upon a time, as a child, I went backpacking with my father in New Mexico.  It was an incredible experience.  While there are many things I could focus on with regard to that trip, the one I will mention is my rock collection.  Like most children, I went through a phase where collecting pretty and shiny rocks was a powerful passion.  On that backpacking trip I discovered that The Rockies had an excellent assortment of collectible rocks.  I brought back tons of rose quartz and more than a few pieces of fools gold.  Until I was gently disillusioned, I was overwhelmed with “gold-fever.”  I just new I was going to be rich.  As I look back and try to remember what happened to “my precious” collection of rocks, I cannot help but remember my disappointment when I learned that all that glitters is not gold. Continue reading

Shoestring or Canvas

I’ll admit it.  I’m a little late to the new year’s feel good, motivational, power list of success building tools, blog party.  And that’s probably where this particular post will land, categorically speaking.  My thoughts, with regard to “Shoestring or Canvas,” have been inspired from a variety of sources. While I may not always proclaim boldly the sources from which a particular thought stream evolved, in this case they are certainly worth mentioning. The first component was an interview I heard on a Catalyst podcast with Jon Acuff the author of  Quitter, and other books.  The second component was from another podcast; Part 3: God’s Great Mission For My Life, a message by Rick Warren from the December 3rd 2011 Saddleback Church podcast.

Similar to other people, I find myself working a “day job” while pursing my true passion/calling on the side when I think I have the time.  Does that sound as crazy to you as it does to me?  Isn’t one supposed to live their dream job and pursue hobbies, or deal with the trivialities of life on the side.  Listening to Jon Acuff’s interview on Catalyst, which touched on his book Quitter – “closing the gap between your day job and your dream job,” hit me right between the ears.  No, I haven’t had the chance to read the book yet, but it’s on my soon-to-read list.  Just the idea of needing to close the gap on living my passion and reversing the reality of my day and dream jobs stirred the stagnancy within my soul.  What am I doing, What do I want to be doing, and what am I actually doing, rather than just thinking about doing, to get there? Continue reading